​UNIQLO uses neuroscience to match your T-shirt to your mood

The Japanese retailer rolls out its new science meets fashion campaign to drive customer engagement

View all images

Japanese retailer, UNIQLO, has rolled out its first-ever neuroscience fashion campaign that matches clothing selection to consumer’s moods.

The wearable technology, UMood, is placed on the forehead of customers, who are then shown a series of still images and videos. Their neurological reactions provide a brainwave reading, allowing UNIQLO to score this against an algorithm that will then suggest a t-shirt from the retailer’s range to match the consumer’s state of mind. These include feeling ‘adventurous’, ‘calm’ or ‘stressed.’

Consumer neuroscientist at Nuro and Honorary Fellow from the University of Melbourne, Dr Phil Harris, said the campaign reflects a growing trend for brands to turn to neuroscience technology to give them an edge with consumers.

“We’ve seen neuroscience infiltrate the way our advertisements are put together and which advertisements make it onto TV, so it was really only a matter of time before leading brands, like UNIQLO, built this into their in-store experience,” he said. “This is just the tip of the iceberg, and showcases how neuroscience is influencing how major brands now operate and market themselves.”

Comedian Ben Law appearing as the face of UNIQLO's new UMood campaign
Comedian Ben Law appearing as the face of UNIQLO's new UMood campaign

Harris agreed this new technology is set to revolutionise the fashion and retail industry moving forward, especially with regard to tailoring consumer choice.

“We’ve found when consumers have a lot of choice, they have a lot of trouble making decisions,” he said. “I see a tool that helps narrow the range of options for someone that supports that choice, and there are so many industries that can benefit from that, so it has lots of potential.”

UNIQLO’s marketing director, Tracey Lang, forecast the campaign will appeal to most demographics. However, the campaign does not involve capturing consumer data while using the headset and is purely a strategy to drive engagement at this stage.

“We’ve designed this to be a fun and engaging experience for the consumer,” she said. “It’s not about consumer research by any means, but we do have some great ideas to think about in the future.”

While UNIQLO is well-known for its innovative fabric and garment technology globally, the UMood launch comes as part of the retailer’s ongoing commitment to enhance product experience for customers, Lang said.

“Clothing is one of our greatest forms of expression, and every day we express our mood through what we wear,” she said. “We’re excited to be the first retail brand in Australia to experiment with this kind of technology and enable a new shopping experience for our customers.”

The UNIQLO UMood campaign has first rolled out at Pitt Street Mall in Sydney, before going on a road to the store’s metropolitan branches.

“After that, we’re not sure what we’re going to do with it,” Lang said. “It depends on how much engagement and how much fun consumers are having with it.”

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO conversation on LinkedIn: CMO ANZ, join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia, or check us out on Google+: google.com/+CmoAu

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Blog Posts

Designing for a cashless society

More movement has been made toward a cashless society recently, and already we are starting to see enormous implications across our society.

Katja Forbes

Founder and chief, sfyte

Setting advertising objectives for financial performance

I’ll often be talking to clients and at some point say, ‘the most important thing is justifying price’. Then moments later, ‘the most important thing is increasing the size of your customer base’.

Kyle Ross

Strategist, TRP

5 common mistakes to avoid in scalable customer experience

CX is about future-proofing your business by ensuring that your commercial model is always looped into your customers' needs, perceptions, values, beliefs, motivators, and detractors.

Tom Uhlhorn

Founder and strategy director, Tiny CX

Unfortunately, the title "AdTech Magic Quadrant" is misleading as it only represent a fraction of the ecosystem. It it is a useful docume...

Ludovic Leforestier

Report: Gartner recognises the best adtech players in Magic Quadrant

Read more

Thanks for writing about chatbots. Definitely bots have the exciting future when it comes to customer engagement, transactional and conve...

Giridhar Prathap Reddy

Australian Open chalks up strong ticket sales with chatbot

Read more

Hello, where are the explanations of all the levels explained? I'd like to review this with a couple of colleagues. Thanks.

Melinda Gonzalez

CMO launches CMO CX, debuts customer experience maturity assessment

Read more

A great and accurate commentary - today we rarely get true personalisation. On web journeys cookies or logins remember who we are, what w...

Ian Moyse

Salesforce: Personalisation is a long way off what consumers now expect

Read more

Very nice information !! We provide almost every indian satta matka games with fast results. Online Matka play becomes easy with genuine ...

rsgame

Image intelligence:10 must-see infographics for marketers

Read more

Latest Podcast

More podcasts

Sign in