How Citrix is driving customer conversions with a new startup technology

Collaboration software vendor partners with startup on its online walk-through and demonstration technology to lift sales conversion rates

For as long as companies have been selling online, they have struggled to match the offline world’s ability to have someone stand alongside the buyer to walk them through a product’s features and benefits.

US-based collaboration software maker, Citrix, believes it has found the next best thing, thanks to technology from startup company, WalkMe.

Founded in 2012, WalkMe enables the creation of sophisticated online walk-throughs and demonstrations that guide users through features and functions by tagging websites with a sequence of instruction bubbles. While the technology was initially designed for training purposes, increasingly it is being used to drive sales conversion and promote premium features.

For Citrix, WalkMe was initially engaged to help customers of its GoToWebinar Web conferencing service become accustomed to a new user interface.

“We wanted those customers who were getting converted over to the new UI to see that everything was still there, it was just enhanced and updated,” says Citrix’ marketing conversion manager, Jay Hall.

It was at this time that Citrix realised the tool could also be useful in encouraging its ‘triallers’ to convert to paid versions.

Hall says the company has recently completed a test using a 50/50 split of its trial customers, and early results have shown a much faster conversion for the version that featured WalkMe.

“The control group that didn’t experience WalkMe had 6 per cent conversion rate, whereas with WalkMe they were converting at a 13.3 per cent conversion rate,” Hall says. “What that showed was that customers were engaged with the product and after their trial ended, they were likely to converts at a faster rate.”

Another benefit was the ability to draw attention to specific features within the product, such as recording audio from the webinar, which was highlighted with a WalkMe tag.

“We had a 41 per cent increase in the test group over the control group got to that audio page,” Hall says.

When using WalkMe users are prompted through a series of bubbles that ‘walk’ them through sequence of product features or the process of completing a task. What makes the technology different from competing solutions is the ability for tags to be set contextually to the task being performed, and their ability continue functioning across different devices, such as from a PR to a tablet or a smartphone. The tool also includes extensive analytics capabilities for tracking user behaviour.

Head of corporate and marketing communications at WalkMe, Boaz Amidor, describes the technology as like adding a GPS to a website or service. While WalkMe was initially used for training and on-boarding of staff, increasingly it is being used as a sales conversion tool.

“The Bank of Montreal uses us for its customers,” Amidor says. “Insurance companies use it to educate their customers. When you are smart you can use a tool like WalkMe to drive people to higher health coverage.”

Amidor says the technology also results in savings through decreasing call volumes within the contact centre.

“The average cost of a call to a call centre, no matter where it is in the world, is US$9,” Amidor says. “And when she uses a machine like WalkMe it is a percentage of a cent.”

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO conversation on LinkedIn: CMO ANZ, join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia, or check us out on Google+: google.com/+CmoAu

Join the CMO newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Blog Posts

3 ways customer data can increase online sales conversion

Data has been an increasingly critical factor in improving the efficiency and effectiveness of marketing and business operations.

James Bennett

Chief experience officer, Kalido

Our sharing future is both terrifying and exciting

Discussing the future in a realistic fashion is often a disappointing prospect. For all the talk of hoverboards, jetpacks and lightsabers changing the way we do things, the reality tends to end up being something as mundane as a slightly cheaper way to get around the city.

Jason Dooris

CEO and founder, Atomic 212

Queue experiences that are distinctive, memorable and shareable

Customer service that’s quick, easy and convenient has been shown to boost customer satisfaction. So it’s an odd juxtaposition that customer queues have become a sharable customer experience.

Hi James, shouldn't marketers also be focusing on collecting and utilizing up to date first-party profiling data on customers so that mes...

Tom

3 ways customer data can increase online sales conversion

Read more

Wouldn't reconnecting with younger consumers be in direct contravention of the code on alcohol advertising?

Tim Palmer

Vodka Cruiser reconnects with younger consumers via category-first Facebook Live campaign

Read more

Thanks for the article Jennifer, you raise some interesting points. The supermarket and shopping centre examples particularly struck a c...

Jill Brennan

Why marketers should take note of social robots

Read more

Winning the retail game is really tricky at this point in time. Many retailers have declared themselves as bankrupt. But yes harnessing t...

Vanessa.M.Magers

​Bricks and clicks: Balancing digital and physical to win the retail game

Read more

Excellent article, Thank you.

Steve Beards

How Aprimo hopes to help marketers tackle distribution of content, funds and data

Read more

Latest Podcast

More podcasts

Sign in