London buses trial beacon technology for smartphone advertising

500 buses in the capital have been equipped with Bluetooth Low Energy devices

Passengers on London buses will soon be able to receive targeted advertisements on their smartphones with the trial of beacon technology.

The pilot scheme - which will initially be available on 500 buses - is the result of a partnership between proximity marketing firm Proxama and outdoor advertising business Exterion Media. It follows a six month trial on 110 buses in Norwich conducted by the two firms.

Using Bluetooth Low Energy technology provided by Proxama, retailers in local areas will be able to send in-app messages directly to passengers. In return for being served with ads, the service could mean commuters being offered deals from retailers.

According to Proxama, targeting consumers outside of the home is an effective way of attracting business, as it is more likely to prompt 'immediate action' from potential customers.

It said that the Norwich bus trial highlighted the possibilities of the technology, with 30 percent of users click through from receipt of notification, and 2,000 app downloads.

"The trial in Norwich and our partnership with Exterion Media showed us that consumers are open to receiving content via their mobile devices while they travel, so we expect to experience a similar level of success once we roll out across London," Jon Worley, CEO of Proxama Marketing Division. "By ensuring that content pushed to users is relevant, personal and received at the right time, beacons are set to enhance Londoners' commuting experiences."

Despite a slow start, beacon technology is gradually gaining wider acceptance in the UK for a variety of use cases. A trial is currently underway at London's Pimlico Underground station to assist blind and partially sighted people to navigate independently, while Barclays is experimenting with the technology in branches to improve accessibility for customers with disabilities.

Meanwhile retailers such as House of Fraser, Hawes & Curtis and Bentall have installed devices in mannequins to send information about clothes on display to shoppers, while Urban Outfitters and US retail giant Walmart are also among those backing the use of beacon technology.

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Latest Videos

More Videos

Algorithms that can make sense of unstructured data is the future. It's great to see experts in the field getting together in Melbourne t...

Sumit Takim

In pictures: Harnessing AI for customer engagement - CMO roundtable Melbourne

Read more

Are you sure they wont start a platform that the cheese is white, pretty sure that is racist

Hite

New brand name for Coon Cheese revealed

Read more

Real digital transformation requires reshaping the way the business create value for customers. Achieving this requires that organization...

ravi H

10 lessons Telstra has learnt through its T22 transformation

Read more

thanks

Lillian Juliet

How Winedirect has lifted customer recency, frequency and value with a digital overhaul

Read more

Having an effective Point of Sale system implemented in your retail store can streamline the transactions and data management activities....

Sheetal Kamble

​Jurlique’s move to mobile POS set to enhance customer experience

Read more

Blog Posts

Brand storytelling lessons from Singapore’s iconic Fullerton hotel

In early 2020, I had the pleasure of staying at the newly opened Fullerton Hotel in Sydney. It was on this trip I first became aware of the Fullerton’s commitment to brand storytelling.

Gabrielle Dolan

Business storytelling leader

You’re doing it wrong: Emotion doesn’t mean emotional

If you’ve been around advertising long enough, you’ve probably seen (or written) a slide which says: “They won’t remember what you say, they’ll remember how you made them feel.” But it’s wrong. Our understanding of how emotion is used in advertising has been ill informed and poorly applied.

Zac Martin

Senior planner, Ogilvy Melbourne

Why does brand execution often kill creativity?

The launch of a new brand, or indeed a rebrand, is a transformation to be greeted with fanfare. So why is it that once the brand has launched, the brand execution phase can also be the moment at which you kill its creativity?

Rich Curtis

CEO, FutureBrand A/NZ

Sign in