Report: Consumers say scrap annoying ad tactics

In global poll conducted by Marketo, two-thirds of respondents said they are tuning out the old-fashioned brand strategy of blasting the same message over and over

Two-thirds of consumers are highly annoyed by the way brands repeatedly blast advertising messages, a recent survey conducted by Marketo has revealed.

The poll, conducted by Marketo, surveyed more than 2200 consumers in Australia, the US, UK, France and Germany. While the responses varied from country to country, Australia stood out as one of the most intolerant when it came to seeing the same ad messages over and over again. The preferred response seems obvious – 45 per cent of Australians said, ‘show ads to me less often.’

“It’s expected that consumers would rather not see ads, but it’s encouraging that more than half didn’t choose the ‘less ads’ response,”Marketo’s CMO, Sanjay Dholakia, said.

Dholakia said making ads more personalised also surfaced as an issue in the survey, with a quarter of respondents saying they wanted content more relevant to them, and for advertisers to pay attention to where they prefer seeing ads. A further 14 per cent suggested advertisers relate content back to how the consumer has interacted with them.

“This demonstrates how people expect advertising, but they have grown tired of the one-size-fits-all approach,” he said. “Advertisers have to engage more on a one-to-one basis.”

The report further revealed Australian’s particular dislike for push ads in mobile apps. Thirty one per cent said it was the type of advertising that irritated them most, compared to just 18 per cent in Germany and 27 per cent in the US. TV ads ran a close second.

Instead, the survey showed consumers prefer to interact with brands on their own terms. Forty nine per cent of Australians said visiting their website was the most likely way they would engage with their favourite brands. Following and engaging via social media was the preference of 23 per cent and email newsletters popular with 21 per cent.

“These results are proof of the challenge that companies face when trying to consistently engage their customers across a wide range of digital channel,” Dholakia added. “For years, campaigns have been crafted in isolation, often designed in silos with a specific digital channel in mind. Facebook ads, for example, are often not linked to prior interaction on a company’s website. This lack of connectedness between digital channels makes it difficult for companies to have a two-way conversation with individuals, which is why they resort to the one-size-fits-all approach.”

Earlier this year, Marketo introduced a solution aimed at helping brands tailor their advertising to an individual, allowing the messages to be customised based on where a person is in their buying journey. Ad Bridge connects online advertising to an overall marketing strategy.

“Research like this shows consumers are savvier than many give them credit for,” Dholakia concluded. “They understand the concept of personalised messaging. Many, it seems, are annoyed that they are not seeing more of it.”

More from Marketo

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO Australia conversation on LinkedIn: CMO Australia, join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia, or check us out on Google+: google.com/+CmoAu

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Blog Posts

Is customer segmentation dead?

Ginni Rometty, the CEO of IBM, announced the death of customer segmentation five years ago saying, "The shift is to go from the segment to the individual. She might have been a bit premature for most marketers, but if customer segmentation isn't dead yet, it's definitely on life support.

Richard Taylor

Senior digital strategist, Spinach

How people buy brands

Andrew Ehrenberg was a giant in the field of marketing science. He believed scientific methods could reveal law-like patterns of how people buy. In this post, I summarise one of Ehrenberg’s most important discoveries and its implications on how people buy brands.

Kyle Ross

Strategist, TRP

Is artificial intelligence riddled with bias?

The purpose of Artificial Intelligence (AI) has always been to replace the menial and repetitive tasks we do each day in every sector, so that we can concentrate on doing what we do best. Saving time and money has certainly been a decent outcome as AI infiltrates the business landscape, however, now we are starting to see problems that cause major issues in practice.

Katja Forbes

Founder and chief, sfyte

At the deeper levels of artificial intelligence, computing machines make all kinds of correlations among whatever data is available to th...

Fraction Tech

Is artificial intelligence riddled with bias? - Customer Design - CMO Australia

Read more

https://myiplookup.com/ - find your ip address and location information in our main page. Also there are many ip tools you can use : IP L...

savefrom

iSelect outlines new approach to arrest ineffective marketing as its reports full-year results

Read more

https://myiplookup.com/ - this website will allow you to View Alexa Ranking and graph Check http headers of a website, tool to compare te...

savefrom

The Star's first CMO creates all-new marketing team

Read more

Good tips to follow. Thank you!

Anna Travis

5 things every business can do to drive brand loyalty

Read more

Thank you! That was useful to know.

Belia Adam

Why your best social marketing brand tool could be hiding in plain sight

Read more

Latest Podcast

More podcasts

Sign in