LÓreal launches virtual cosmetics trial via augmented reality

New mobile app using facial recognition technology to allow women to try on different products virtually and in real time

Eva Longoria
Eva Longoria

L’Oréal has launched what it claims is the first-of-its-kind app allowing women to virtually try on its cosmetics products using augmented reality technology.

The ‘Makeup Genius’ app is based on facial mapping technology previously used in the film and gaming industries, and turns a smartphone or iPad camera into a virtual mirror that women can use to try on L’Oréal products in real time.

Consumers scan a product or advertisement to detect a colour match, then can virtually try on individual products as well as curated looks suggested by expert makeup artists. These images can then be shared via Facebook.

The app was devised by the brand’s new US Connected Beauty Incubator business development division in partnership with facial mapping technology company, Image Metrics. It was launched in Sydney this week by Australian ambassador, Megan Gale, along with international ambassador, Barbara Palvin.

Makeup Genius is now available as a free download for both Apple and Android devices.

“At L’Oréal, our ambition is to offer beauty for all,” said head of digital in Australia, Christophe Eymery, adding that the new app helped better connect the physical and digital buying experience for consumers.

Related: L’Oréal goes back to the future with content marketing agenda

“Our ambition for Makeup Genius was to create a game-changing digital experience that was on par with the same best-in-class standards as our product portfolio,” he said. “The Makeup Genius mobile app is the solution to try before you buy that is accessible to women everywhere right at their fingertips.”

The facial mapping technology works by capturing 64 facial data points and 100 facial expressions, which L’Oréal claimed help it discern an individual’s lips, eyes and other facial contours. It also means the virtual makeup experience adjusts as a consumer turns their head or changes their facial expression, and supports 400 different lighting conditions.

As part of the launch, L’Oréal enlisted US actresses, Eva Longoria and Julianne Moore, to showcase the ability to capture different skin tones and colours. L’Oréal Paris’ celebrity makeup artist, Billy B, also curated a number of looks for consumers.

“With this app, women don’t need a professional makeup artist because they can become their own makeup designer,” he said.

Makeup Genius is one component of the new Makeup Designer Paris brand platform, which will extend into advertising and packaging, L’Oréal said.

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO Australia conversation on LinkedIn: CMO Australia, join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia, or check us out on Google+: google.com/+CmoAu

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Blog Posts

4 creative skills that will be useful forever

In recent times, the clarion call from futurists, economists, marketers, educators and leaders the world over is one of slight panic, “The world is changing and you’re not ready for it!” And of course, they make a very good point.

Kieran Flanagan and Dan Gregory

Speakers, trainers, co-authors

Why defining brand strategy is vital to capitalising on quick wins

Big brands were once protected from small brands by high barriers to entry. Big brands had the resources to employ big agencies, to crack big ideas and to invest in big campaigns. They had the luxury of time to debate strategies and work on long-term innovation pipelines. Retailers used to partner with big brands.

Troy McKinnna

Co-founder, Agents of Spring, Calm & Stormy

3 ways to leverage the talents of your team to avoid disruption

​According to the World Economic Forum in its most recent The Future of Jobs report, the most important skills for the future are not technical, task-oriented skills, but higher-order skills such as creativity, social influence, active learning, and analytical thinking.

Gihan Perera

Futurist, leadership consultant

I thought this was what Salesforce Audience Studio (formerly Salesforce DMP) was supposed to do. How are a CDP and a DMP different? I'm c...

Tony Ahn

Salesforce announces customer data platform

Read more

Well written Vanessa!! Agreed with your view that human experience is marketing's next frontier. Those businesses who are focused on the ...

Clyde Griffith

Forget customer experience, human experience is marketing's next frontier

Read more

Great tips for tops skills need to develop and stay competitive

Nick

The top skills needed to stay competitive in a rapidly changing workforce

Read more

The popularity of loyalty programs is diminishing, though I'd say it is because customers are savvy enough to recognise when a loyalty pr...

Heather

It’s time for marketers to rethink their approach to ‘loyalty’

Read more

Thanks Nadia for sharing this blog. It has really useful and amazing information about Salesforce Commerce Cloud and digital engagement w...

Holly Smith

Adidas taps data and technology smarts to build personalised digital engagement with consumers

Read more

Latest Podcast

More podcasts

Sign in