IBM puts a price on its Twitter analytics service

IBM is ready to sell the first sentiment analytics service that draws on a partnership it formed with Twitter last October

Dollar under spotlight

Spotlight shing on dollar sign on red background.

finance, banking, bank, currency, monetary, money, notes, trade, buying, selling, america, canada, USA, dollar, sign, symbol, wealth, incentive, spotlight, focus, scrutiny, color, colour, horizontal, red, black, white, shadow, concept, conceptual, illustration, graphical, graphic, effects, digital, dreamstime

dreamstime_0
Dollar under spotlight Spotlight shing on dollar sign on red background. finance, banking, bank, currency, monetary, money, notes, trade, buying, selling, america, canada, USA, dollar, sign, symbol, wealth, incentive, spotlight, focus, scrutiny, color, colour, horizontal, red, black, white, shadow, concept, conceptual, illustration, graphical, graphic, effects, digital, dreamstime dreamstime_0

The insight gained from a single tweet might not be worth much, but what about from a million?

IBM thinks businesses will pay US$2,000 to analyze a million tweets and correlate them with data sources including weather forecasts and sales figures.

"The first access to Twitter data is free, then it's pay as you go," Alistair Rennie, general manager for business analytics at IBM, said at Cebit on Tuesday.

The commercial launch of the Twitter analytics tool on IBM's Bluemix Platform-as-a-Service is one of the first fruits of a collaboration IBM and Twitter announced last October.

Then, the companies promised to bring a number of services to market, including one that allows third-party developers to integrate the Twitter analytics feed into their own projects via Bluemix.

In the intervening months, IBM has recruited 100 companies to test the service. On Tuesday it provided heavily disguised details of how three of them are using it. Some of the early customers are wary of being named because they don't want to encourage their competitors to access the same market intelligence, said IBM spokeswoman Kristi Eells.

Channelling the wisdom of crowds through Bluemix is cheap if you have a small crowd or don't want too much wisdom: The first five million tweets analyzed through the service are free. After that, said Eells, an additional 1 million tweets will cost $2,000 per month.

While plenty of other vendors offer Twitter analytics services, the key to IBM's offering is its ability to correlate findings with other information sources, whether public ones such as weather or fashion trends, or company-specific ones such as sales figures or personnel records.

IBM said one of the customers testing the service, a telecommunications operator, discovered a correlation between the weather and complaints about service outages. IBM uncovered this by analyzing weather reports and information about the location of tweets. Another company used it to quantify the extent to which staff turnover affected customer satisfaction.

While IBM's focus for now is on Twitter as a source of sentiment data, in other markets there are other collections of such data, said Robert Picciano, senior vice president for IBM Analytics. Twitter is the dominant source in Europe and the U.S., but in Asia it could be Line or QQ. Indeed, IBM has already worked with QQ owner Tencent on mining such data on its portal for the soccer World Cup last year, Picciano said.

Peter Sayer covers general technology breaking news for IDG News Service, with a special interest in open source software and related European intellectual property legislation. Send comments and news tips to Peter at peter_sayer@idg.com.

Join the newsletter!

Or
Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Blog Posts

Why doing your job well is the key to innovation

The words ‘power company’ and ‘innovation’ probably don’t seem like a natural combination. In fact, when I first went for a marketing role with an electricity company, I semi-dreaded the work I thought I’d be doing.

Catherine Anderson

Head of marketing, Powershop Australia

The great unlearning: How brands can assist with the adoption of voice

Mainstream adoption of voice technology will be all about what consumers are learning not to do.

Ash Mustchin

Director, digital and experiences, Principals

Why getting intimate is key to creating a great customer experience

According to CMO’s State of the CMO 2017 research, 83 per cent of CMOs believe customer experience to be central to their role. An interesting stat considering few of us experience great brand experiences.

Pip Stocks

CEO and founder, BrandHook

'to lesson screen time'LOL someone needs a lesson on how to lessen typos.

Andrew Ward

Golden Circles invests in content play to drive brand purpose

Read more

Hey Nadia, interesting read. We have all read about what your chatbots should offer or have but haven't came across with anything about w...

Ashish K Jain

What not to do when building chatbots and voice-based brand interactions

Read more

There are some many other great solutions compared to the ones you listed here. Our clients left some of those and switched to MARA (getM...

Alexandru Rada

CMO's top 10 martech stories for the week - 9 June

Read more

Charming Shane. You know this is a public forum, right ?

Peter Strohkorb

​CMO Interview: Why aligning sales and marketing drives innovation at Konica Minolta

Read more

I agree customer intimacy is a great way of creating better customer experience. Especially in the Insurance and Financial industry. Her...

Jessicalopez1989

Why getting intimate is key to creating a great customer experience and optimising customer value

Read more

Latest Podcast

More podcasts

Sign in