Infographic: Top digital trends in 2015

New Bellow Pottinger Digital findings capture the 15 most talked about technologies in 2014 to gauge what marketers should watch in 2015

Near field communications (NFC), the Internet of Things and wearables are the top digital trends expected to change the way brands communicate in 2015.

That’s according to new findings from the digital consultancy arm of communications agency, Bell Pottinger, which captured the most talked about trends online in 2014 and ranked them in order of the percentage increase throughout the year.

These have then been compiled into an infographic marking the top 15 digital trends for 2015. The top five digital trends were:

  1. Near field communications, which saw a 358 per cent increase over 2014. Bell Pottinger pointed to recent research undertaken by Carlisle and Gallegher Consulting Group, which forecast half of today’s smartphone users will use mobile wallets for their preferred payment method by 2017;

  2. Internet of Things, which chalked up a 283 per cent increase in 2014. According to Gartner, 25 billion devices will be connected and in use by 2020;

  3. Wearables, which recorded a 220 per cent rise in coverage this year. Analyst firm, Forrester, has forecast more than 79 million wearables are expected to be sold next year;

  4. Internal communications, with a 167 per cent increase. Gartner predicts half of corporate network devices will be mobile in 2015;

  5. Storytelling, which saw a 145 per cent increase in coverage. Bell Pottinger also pointed to a Social Media Examiner report, which claimed visual blog posts drive 180 per cent more engagement than text-based ones.

Related: How wearables could change the face of marketing

“While technology will be one of the biggest drivers of marketing change in the new year, the key focus for brands will be on delivering truly integrated strategies,” commented Bell Pottinger Digital partner and managing director.

“The most successful brands in 2015 will be those that harness new technology to deliver a single experience to consumers wherever they are in their journey.”

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Latest Videos

More Videos

It's an interesting direction, and fair play that they've backed what their service differentiator in the market is. It's a bit clunky bi...

Jeff

Versa launches bot-activated website

Read more

Algorithms that can make sense of unstructured data is the future. It's great to see experts in the field getting together to discuss AI.

Sumit Takim

In pictures: Harnessing AI for customer engagement - CMO roundtable Melbourne

Read more

Real digital transformation requires reshaping the way the business create value for customers. Achieving this requires that organization...

ravi H

10 lessons Telstra has learnt through its T22 transformation

Read more

thanks

Lillian Juliet

How Winedirect has lifted customer recency, frequency and value with a digital overhaul

Read more

Having an effective Point of Sale system implemented in your retail store can streamline the transactions and data management activities....

Sheetal Kamble

​Jurlique’s move to mobile POS set to enhance customer experience

Read more

Blog Posts

Brand storytelling lessons from Singapore’s iconic Fullerton hotel

In early 2020, I had the pleasure of staying at the newly opened Fullerton Hotel in Sydney. It was on this trip I first became aware of the Fullerton’s commitment to brand storytelling.

Gabrielle Dolan

Business storytelling leader

You’re doing it wrong: Emotion doesn’t mean emotional

If you’ve been around advertising long enough, you’ve probably seen (or written) a slide which says: “They won’t remember what you say, they’ll remember how you made them feel.” But it’s wrong. Our understanding of how emotion is used in advertising has been ill informed and poorly applied.

Zac Martin

Senior planner, Ogilvy Melbourne

Why does brand execution often kill creativity?

The launch of a new brand, or indeed a rebrand, is a transformation to be greeted with fanfare. So why is it that once the brand has launched, the brand execution phase can also be the moment at which you kill its creativity?

Rich Curtis

CEO, FutureBrand A/NZ

Sign in