Rocket Fuel latest programmatic ad tech vendor to come to Australia

Digital advertising technology vendor confirms appointment of former eBay advertising chief, JJ Eastwood, as new local leader as it highlights Australia's growing RTB market

Yet another programmatic advertising vendor is bringing its technology smarts to Australia as demand for real-time and automated digital advertising solutions continues.

Rocket Fuel, a US-based and publicly listed company founded in 2008, confirmed its intention to expand into the Asia-Pacific region with a new office in Sydney this week. The company provides a programmatic media buying platform based on artificial intelligence (AI) and big data that can be used across digital display, video, mobile and social channels.

The local office will include full local support and focus on delivering managed and self-service programmatic solutions. It will be headed by former eBay head of advertising in A/NZ, JJ Eastwood. A company spokesperson told CMO it has also appointed a group sales director, group sales manager and senior account director.

“Programmatic has grown exponentially in Australia in the last 12 months, so we’re looking forward to building upon this momentum and providing full support for clients in the region,” Eastwood said in a statement.

Target customers include media agencies, large direct clients and brands wishing to bring their programmatic initiatives in-house, the spokesperson said.

Rocket Fuel chairman and CEO, George John, said Eastwood’s role in implementing a fully programmatic advertising sales strategy at eBay in partnership with Google and Mi9, along with his technology credentials, made him a good candidate for expanding Rocket Fuel’s presence in the region.

Rocket Fuel continues to chalk up strong growth, reporting revenue of $92.6m for the second quarter of 2014 to 30 June, up 70 per cent year-on-year. Gross profit also increased by 80 per cent to $45.7m, although the company did report a net loss of $9.8m over the same period.

The company claims to have more than 500 brands using its technology including Birds Eye, Sixt, Lufthansa, Toshiba, Bridgestone and Brooks Running Company. Its competitors include display advertising players such as doubleclick, Brandscreen and Neustar, along with data management platforms (DMPs).

Last month, Rocket Fuel acquired DMP vendor, [X+1], for US$230 million. At the time, John said the purchase will give Rocket Fuel the ability to expand its portfolio of solutions to a larger market and offer better marketing ROI to customers through utilising their own, as well as third-party data. [X+1]’s competitors include BlueKai (now owned by Oracle), Turn and MediaMath.

Related: Programmatic advertising: Digital marketing’s saviour or real-time headache?

“The powerful combination of [X+1]’s marketing and data management platform with our leading artificial intelligence and big data drive optimisation technology opens the door for new, innovative opportunities to improve marketing ROI for our customers,” he stated. “We are strengthening our competitive position while significantly increasing our total addressable market and ability to deliver SaaS-based multi-channel solutions to advertising agencies and enterprise customers.”

According to IDC, Australian spending on real-time bidding (RTB) was $74m in 2013, representing 9 per cent of total display ad sales. This was an increase of 105 per cent on 2012. Total RTB expenditure is expected to rise to $278m by 2017.

In the latest media statement, digital director at media agency Media Circus, Sophie Paulin, said it had run its first campaign out of Australia with Rocket Fuel already after the success of similar programs run by its London-based partners.

"As supply-side vendors have expanded within the market in recent years, the opening of Rocket Fuel's Sydney office will provide us with an excellent opportunity to buy this inventory at scale," she stated.

More on programmatic advertising

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO Australia conversation on LinkedIn: CMO Australia, join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia, or check us out on Google+: google.com/+CmoAu

Signup to CMO’s email newsletter to receive your weekly dose of targeted content for the modern marketing chief.

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments
cmo-xs-promo

Latest Videos

More Videos

I couldn't understand one things why on earth people only talk aboutimpact of digital transformation on banking and finance field instead...

Rajesh Acharya

Digital take-up and experiences help drive Suncorp's solid FY21 performance

Read more

Good afternoon,This is a complaint of the process of refunds which does not comply with Australian legislation. Despite a exhaustive req...

shiree Gilroy

Catch Group combines commercial and marketing role

Read more

I really appreciate your article. Love your Article. By reading your article, its created an idea in my mind about loyalty strategy to ke...

Jack Reacher

Report: Marketers failing to realise the benefits of customer loyalty programs

Read more

One month’s research and we’ve handpicked this generation’s 50 most talented Women CEOs, leading the top multinational companies around t...

Vaishnavi Pillai

Women in leadership the focus on International Women’s Day

Read more

Great post!

deen8

What felix Mobile is doing to keep customer support cost-effective

Read more

Blog Posts

When friction can be a brand’s best friend

I always enjoy those oft-forgotten, in-between moments in any experience. These moments are not necessarily part of any defined experience per se. They likely wouldn’t show up in an organisation’s plans or ideas to help make the customer journey or user flow as simple, easy and seamless as possible.

Rich Curtis

CEO, FutureBrand A/NZ

How much attention should we be paying to the ‘attention economy’?

There’s been a lot of buzz in the advertising industry lately about what’s coined the ‘attention economy’. And it’s fast becoming the new battleground for media channels to prove their wares and to develop and espouse new attention metrics.

Nickie Scriven

CEO, Zenith

Sometimes the best solutions are some of the most counterintuitive

Exceptional CMOs do exceptional things for themselves and for those they inspire. At your best you are creative, innovative and inspirational. We have a problem though. We now live in a corporate world that demands sensibility where everything you do is measurable and stakeholders demand predictability – the antithesis of breakthrough and transformation.

Hamish Thomson

Author, former regional president and global brand head, Mars Incorporated

Sign in