Salesforce.com launches Sales Reach for real-time selling and marketing

Salespeople can track prospects closer than ever before

Salesforce.com is combining its Pardot marketing software, sales automation application and social communities platform into a new product called Sales Reach, which it says can help salespeople nurture leads and make deals in real time.

Today's buyers don't follow a linear, predictable process, said Mark Woollen, senior vice president of product marketing, Salesforce.com Sales Cloud. Sales Reach gives salespeople the ability to closely track a prospect's buying mood and then "strike while the iron is hot," all from their mobile devices, Woollen said.

To this end, Sales Reach provides real-time activity notifications that get pushed to a salesperson's device. For example, a salesperson might get a notification that a prospect just downloaded a case study from the company's product website and looked at pricing information, said Salesforce.com product evangelist Mathew Sweezey.

"This is the right time to call him," Sweezey said. In the past, a salesperson would set up a task in their CRM (customer-relationship-management) system to remind themselves to call the prospect within a certain time frame, which is a roll of the dice compared to Sales Reach's capabilities, according to Sweezey.

Sales Reach's purpose doesn't end there, however. The salesperson may reach the prospect on the phone only to learn they didn't have time to have a serious phone conversation. The salesperson could then kick off a 30-day lead-nurturing campaign that sends out follow-up emails.

One of the emails could include an invitation to join an online community, also run on Salesforce.com's systems, where the prospect could interact with peers considering the purchase of the same products and services.

Sales Reach would send a notification if and when the prospect joined the community. It also logs all of the posts they make back into the original customer record. With this in hand, the salesperson can better judge when to call the prospect again, and what to talk about when they connect, Sweezey said.

The new product will be released in the first half of next year, with pricing to be announced at that time.

Chris Kanaracus covers enterprise software and general technology breaking news for The IDG News Service. Chris' email address is Chris_Kanaracus@idg.com

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Latest Videos

More Videos

Are you sure they wont start a platform that the cheese is white, pretty sure that is racist

Hite

New brand name for Coon Cheese revealed

Read more

Real digital transformation requires reshaping the way the business create value for customers. Achieving this requires that organization...

ravi H

10 lessons Telstra has learnt through its T22 transformation

Read more

thanks

Lillian Juliet

How Winedirect has lifted customer recency, frequency and value with a digital overhaul

Read more

Having an effective Point of Sale system implemented in your retail store can streamline the transactions and data management activities....

Sheetal Kamble

​Jurlique’s move to mobile POS set to enhance customer experience

Read more

I too am regularly surprised at how little care a large swathe of consumers take over the sharing and use of their personal data. As a m...

Catherine Stenson

Have customers really changed? - Marketing edge - CMO Australia

Read more

Blog Posts

Brand storytelling lessons from Singapore’s iconic Fullerton hotel

In early 2020, I had the pleasure of staying at the newly opened Fullerton Hotel in Sydney. It was on this trip I first became aware of the Fullerton’s commitment to brand storytelling.

Gabrielle Dolan

Business storytelling leader

You’re doing it wrong: Emotion doesn’t mean emotional

If you’ve been around advertising long enough, you’ve probably seen (or written) a slide which says: “They won’t remember what you say, they’ll remember how you made them feel.” But it’s wrong. Our understanding of how emotion is used in advertising has been ill informed and poorly applied.

Zac Martin

Senior planner, Ogilvy Melbourne

Why does brand execution often kill creativity?

The launch of a new brand, or indeed a rebrand, is a transformation to be greeted with fanfare. So why is it that once the brand has launched, the brand execution phase can also be the moment at which you kill its creativity?

Rich Curtis

CEO, FutureBrand A/NZ

Sign in