Databricks takes on Google data streaming analysis with Spark

Databricks Cloud will provide Spark-based streaming analysis as a service

Taking on Google, Databricks plans to offer its own cloud service for analyzing live data streams, one based on the Apache Spark software.

Databricks Cloud is designed to provide a platform for analyzing streaming data, much like the Google DataFlow service announced last week.

Like Google DataFlow, Databricks Cloud promises to offer a single programming model that cuts across different approaches to data analysis, including support for batch programming and live data streaming. And like Google DataFlow, Databricks Cloud will first be offered in preview mode, with full commercial support due by the end of the year.

The two services are aimed to different markets, according to Ion Stoica, CEO of Databricks.

"Google DataFlow is really targeted to developers. We also have higher-level interfaces for data scientists and data engineers," Stoica said.

Databricks also guarantees application portability. Because the entire stack is based on open source software, users can move their workloads to other Apache Spark installations should they need to, Stoica said. "You can take your application and run it in another cloud," Stoica said.

Such a service could be used by enterprises for tasks such as churn analysis, which can determine why a customer stops using a product, or for fraud detection, where a malicious activity can be spotted while it is still taking place.

The University of California, Berkeley's AMP (Algorithms, Machines and People) Lab originally developed Spark as a unified processing engine, one able to provide a platform for a variety of data analysis tasks, including interactive queries, steaming data analysis, machine learning and graph computation.

A number of developers behind Spark went on to form Databricks. The software itself, designed to run on a cluster of servers, is now managed as an open source project under the guidance of the Apache Software Foundation.

Offering Spark as a service eliminates the arduous task for setting up and maintaining an in-house implementation of Spark, Stoica noted.

"Clusters are hard to set up and maintain. To build a data pipeline, you need to stitch together multiple tools, and the tools are still hard to use. So extracting value out of the data is still a struggle," Stoica said.

Initially, Databricks Cloud will be run on Amazon Web Services, though eventually it will also run on other cloud providers such as Google.

In addition to the Spark platform itself, Databricks will provide a set of built-in applications that can do common data analysis tasks. Users can build their own workflows, or issue queries and interact with the data directly. Output can be piped to a dashboard or a report.

Databricks is not the only company making use of Spark's capabilities. ClearStory offers an analytics software package based on Spark that allows organizations to aggregate dozens of unstructured data sources for analysis, far more than can be easily done through traditional business intelligence tools, said ClearStory CEO Sharmila Mulligan.

Databricks also announced Monday that it has received US$33 million in series B funding led by venture capital firm, New Enterprise Associates, with follow-on investment from Andreessen Horowitz.

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Latest Videos

Launch marketing council Episode 5: Retailer and supplier

In our fifth and final episode, we delve into the relationship between retailer and supplier and how it drives and influences launch marketing strategies and success. To do that, we’re joined by Campbell Davies, group general manager of Associated Retailers Limited, and Kristin Viccars, marketing director A/NZ, Apex Tool Group. Also featured are Five by Five Global managing director, Matt Lawton, and CMO’s Nadia Cameron.

More Videos

Hi,When online retailers establish their multi channel strategy and they are using or will to use live chatbot to support their customers...

Alice Labs Pte. Ltd.

CMO's top 8 martech stories for the week - 6 May 2021

Read more

Thanks for nice information regarding Account-based Marketing. PRO IT MELBOURNE is best SEO Agency in Melbourne have a team of profession...

PRO IT MELBOURNE

Cultivating engaging content in Account-based Marketing (ABM)

Read more

The best part: optimizing your site for SEO enables you to generate high traffic, and hence free B2B lead generation. This is done throug...

Sergiu Alexei

The top 6 content challenges facing B2B firms

Read more

Nowadays, when everything is being done online, it is good to know that someone is trying to make an improvement. As a company, you are o...

Marcus

10 lessons Telstra has learnt through its T22 transformation

Read more

Check out tiny twig for comfy and soft organic baby clothes.

Morgan mendoza

Binge and The Iconic launch Inactivewear clothing line

Read more

Blog Posts

Getting privacy right in a first-party data world

With continued advances in marketing technology, data privacy continues to play catchup in terms of regulation, safety and use. The laws that do exist are open to interpretation and potential misuse and that has led to consumer mistrust and increasing calls for a stronger regulatory framework to protect personal information.

Furqan Wasif

Head of biddable media, Tug

​Beyond greenwashing: Why brands need to get their house in order first

Environmental, Social and (Corporate) Governance is a hot topic for brands right now. But before you start thinking about doing good, Craig Flanders says you best sort out the basics.

Craig Flanders

CEO, Spinach

​The value of collaboration: how to keep it together

Through the ages, from the fields to the factories to the office towers and now to our kitchen tables, collaboration has played a pivotal role in how we live and work. Together. We find partners, live as families, socialise in groups and work as teams. Ultimately, we rely on these collaborative structures to survive and thrive.

Rich Curtis

CEO, FutureBrand A/NZ

Sign in