Brands must create outstanding customer service to win loyalty, finds report

New Optus Future of Business report finds only 39 per cent of consumers reporting a good experience are likely to remain a customer of that organisation

Optus Business president, John Paitaridis
Optus Business president, John Paitaridis

A new Optus report has found only 12 per cent of Australian organisations are delivering outstanding customer experiences despite the fact that 95 per cent of consumers will remain loyal to organisations that do so.

The fourth Future of Business report, which was released during the Optus Vision conference in Sydney on 18 June, found only 39 per cent of customers reporting a good experience are likely to remain a customer of that organisation, compared to 95 per cent of customers who reported an outstanding one.

Customers with an outstanding experience were also five times more likely to become brand advocates compared to customers with good experience.

By contrast, nearly 80 per cent of customers who reported a bad experience said they took some form of action such as complaining to friends or via the Internet.

The Optus report was based on surveys of 550 organisations across enterprise and government, as well as more than 5000 customers.

It also found customer experience and advocacy were the first or second top priority for nearly half of all organisations surveyed, although only 45 per cent said they understood the impact of customer experience on profits and revenue.

Top hurdles to better customer engagement were budget constraints (47 per cent), competing internal agendas or priorities (38 per cent), and lack of department alignment (33 per cent).

Speaking at the Sydney event, Optus Business president, John Paitaridis, urged businesses to strive for more than "good" customer experiences if they want to meet expectations.

“We should not be surprised that ‘good’ is not ‘good enough,” he told attendees. “However, you may be surprised with the difference between what good means and what outstanding means, because that has a massive impact on customer loyalty and retention.

“The key point here is the majority of our customers are at risk if the only level of service we’re providing is only ‘good’. Only outstanding customer experience creates advocates.”

Key things consumers want from brands include engaging with staff that are friendly, meet their needs and are knowledgeable. They also want to interact with real people as often as they can and feel valued, Paitaridis said.

According to the report, 60 per cent of customers can tell when an employee doesn’t have the information and tools to be able to deal with their request, and more than one-third notice when staff members make them wait.

“We can’t hide – customers can see what’s happening and their expectations are high. And as we are listening to customers and trying to get better, the bar keeps moving higher,” Paitaridis continued. “Customer expectations will rise over the next one to two years.”

A key reason is the rapid adoption of technology, which is enabling customers with more choices than ever before, he added.

The Optus report also found 51 per cent of organisations surveyed claimed customer experience is driving technology investments, but are failing to put the right amount of value on the human element of the equation.

For instance, organisations delivering an average customer experience lack in-house skills (43 per cent) buy-in or engagement from staff (38 per cent) and a clear customer experience strategy (32 per cent).

Additionally, organisations with well-aligned departments were far more likely to deliver strong customer experience.

Read more: Guest opinion: Why you need to revaluate and 'pivot' your Facebook strategy

More from CMO on the importance of becoming customer-centric:

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO Australia conversation on LinkedIn: CMO Australia, or join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia

Signup to CMO’s new email newsletter to receive your weekly dose of targeted content for the modern marketing chief.

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Latest Videos

More Videos

Are you sure they wont start a platform that the cheese is white, pretty sure that is racist

Hite

New brand name for Coon Cheese revealed

Read more

Real digital transformation requires reshaping the way the business create value for customers. Achieving this requires that organization...

ravi H

10 lessons Telstra has learnt through its T22 transformation

Read more

thanks

Lillian Juliet

How Winedirect has lifted customer recency, frequency and value with a digital overhaul

Read more

Having an effective Point of Sale system implemented in your retail store can streamline the transactions and data management activities....

Sheetal Kamble

​Jurlique’s move to mobile POS set to enhance customer experience

Read more

I too am regularly surprised at how little care a large swathe of consumers take over the sharing and use of their personal data. As a m...

Catherine Stenson

Have customers really changed? - Marketing edge - CMO Australia

Read more

Blog Posts

Brand storytelling lessons from Singapore’s iconic Fullerton hotel

In early 2020, I had the pleasure of staying at the newly opened Fullerton Hotel in Sydney. It was on this trip I first became aware of the Fullerton’s commitment to brand storytelling.

Gabrielle Dolan

Business storytelling leader

You’re doing it wrong: Emotion doesn’t mean emotional

If you’ve been around advertising long enough, you’ve probably seen (or written) a slide which says: “They won’t remember what you say, they’ll remember how you made them feel.” But it’s wrong. Our understanding of how emotion is used in advertising has been ill informed and poorly applied.

Zac Martin

Senior planner, Ogilvy Melbourne

Why does brand execution often kill creativity?

The launch of a new brand, or indeed a rebrand, is a transformation to be greeted with fanfare. So why is it that once the brand has launched, the brand execution phase can also be the moment at which you kill its creativity?

Rich Curtis

CEO, FutureBrand A/NZ

Sign in