Yahoo drops 'Do Not Track' policy in the name of 'personalised' experience

Company claims it is yet to see a single privacy standard that is effective

Yahoo will stop honoring "Do Not Track" requests made by a user's browser. It will now actively attempt to track an individual's interactions with its site and its content.

"Here at Yahoo, we work hard to provide our users with a highly personalized experience," the ironically named "Yahoo Privacy Team" wrote in a blog post. "We keep people connected to what matters most to them, across devices and around the world. We fundamentally believe the best web is a personalised one."

Yahoo's team claimed Yahoo was originally the first major tech company to implement "Do Not Track," which, in reality, is more of a request from the browser to the website than an order. Yahoo said it had yet to see a single privacy standard that is "effective, easy to use and has been adopted by the broader tech industry." For that reason, as well as its desire for "personalised" experiences, Yahoo changed its policy.

"Personalised" ads, of course, are a mixed bag. On the one hand, if Yahoo knows a consumer is a single man, they won't receive irrelevant ads for maternity clothes. On the other, tailoring an ad to an individual's gender, age, location, and even annual income means that Yahoo can charge far more per ad than it normally would.

Yahoo does allow users to manage certain elements of their privacy via its "Yahoo Privacy Center," where users can manually click a button and opt out of what Yahoo calls "interest-based advertising." Doing so, however, requires users not only to accept cookies into their browser, but also to be logged into Yahoo, across every PC they own, for those privacy settings to be passed along to other devices.

"Do Not Track," of course, allows users to set a blanket statement against tracking across all websites, not just Yahoo. What Yahoo hopes, of course, is that you simply won't bother.

Join the newsletter!

Or
Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Blog Posts

The great unlearning: How brands can assist with the adoption of voice

Mainstream adoption of voice technology will be all about what consumers are learning not to do.

Ash Mustchin

Director, digital and experiences, Principals

Why getting intimate is key to creating a great customer experience

According to CMO’s State of the CMO 2017 research, 83 per cent of CMOs believe customer experience to be central to their role. An interesting stat considering few of us experience great brand experiences.

Pip Stocks

CEO and founder, BrandHook

Creating the ultimate customer-centric environment in 2018

All businesses today that are serious about being successful have adopted a customer-centric environment.

Katja Forbes

Founder and chief, sfyte

'to lesson screen time'LOL someone needs a lesson on how to lessen typos.

Andrew Ward

Golden Circles invests in content play to drive brand purpose

Read more

Hey Nadia, interesting read. We have all read about what your chatbots should offer or have but haven't came across with anything about w...

Ashish K Jain

What not to do when building chatbots and voice-based brand interactions

Read more

There are some many other great solutions compared to the ones you listed here. Our clients left some of those and switched to MARA (getM...

Alexandru Rada

CMO's top 10 martech stories for the week - 9 June

Read more

Charming Shane. You know this is a public forum, right ?

Peter Strohkorb

​CMO Interview: Why aligning sales and marketing drives innovation at Konica Minolta

Read more

I agree customer intimacy is a great way of creating better customer experience. Especially in the Insurance and Financial industry. Her...

Jessicalopez1989

Why getting intimate is key to creating a great customer experience and optimising customer value

Read more

Latest Podcast

More podcasts

Sign in