Klout may be acquired by marketing firm for $US100 million

Lithium Technologies will pay more than $US100 million, according to published reports

Klout
Klout

Apparently Klout is popular.

The website that provides social media users with a measure of their "influence" is close to being acquired by a social marketing company for $US100 million, according to published reports.

The supposed buyer, Lithium Technologies, helps major brands use social media to grow their businesses. It will acquire Klout for a mixture of cash and stock in a deal worth somewhere in the "low nine figures," according to Re/code. That would put the deal somewhere north of $100 million, a price The Wall Street Journal also reported.

Re/code, which cited unnamed sources, cautioned that the deal had been signed but not closed.

Klout and Lithium are both privately held companies based in San Francisco.

Klout users can see their relative influence on the Web ranked on a scale from zero to 100. The calculation is based on how many people their social media posts reach, the people they reach and the people that interact with them.

Klout also offers "perks" to users with particular levels of influence. At present, some users are being offered a free e-book, while others have been offered coupons for fast food, drinks and access to events. The hope is that these "influencers" will tweet about the products and provide the companies exposure.

It may be working. Klout's website lists scores of tweets related to the promotions, and the company says it has delivered 1.25 million "perks."

Klout has just revamped its website to suggest content that it thinks will be attractive to people's followers. It's intended to help users build their brand and connect with more users, and in turn lead to a closer relationship between Klout and its influential users.

Klout claims to have scored half a billion profiles.

While not as well known, Lithium helps companies build websites, blogs, apps, social media and other Internet tools to try and build strong links between companies and their customers. Lithium says it works with more than 300 brands.

Neither company replied to requests for comment.

Martyn Williams covers mobile telecoms, Silicon Valley and general technology breaking news for The IDG News Service. Follow Martyn on Twitter at @martyn_williams. Martyn's e-mail address is martyn_williams@idg.com

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Latest Videos

More Videos

Algorithms that can make sense of unstructured data is the future. It's great to see experts in the field getting together in Melbourne t...

Sumit Takim

In pictures: Harnessing AI for customer engagement - CMO roundtable Melbourne

Read more

Are you sure they wont start a platform that the cheese is white, pretty sure that is racist

Hite

New brand name for Coon Cheese revealed

Read more

Real digital transformation requires reshaping the way the business create value for customers. Achieving this requires that organization...

ravi H

10 lessons Telstra has learnt through its T22 transformation

Read more

thanks

Lillian Juliet

How Winedirect has lifted customer recency, frequency and value with a digital overhaul

Read more

Having an effective Point of Sale system implemented in your retail store can streamline the transactions and data management activities....

Sheetal Kamble

​Jurlique’s move to mobile POS set to enhance customer experience

Read more

Blog Posts

Brand storytelling lessons from Singapore’s iconic Fullerton hotel

In early 2020, I had the pleasure of staying at the newly opened Fullerton Hotel in Sydney. It was on this trip I first became aware of the Fullerton’s commitment to brand storytelling.

Gabrielle Dolan

Business storytelling leader

You’re doing it wrong: Emotion doesn’t mean emotional

If you’ve been around advertising long enough, you’ve probably seen (or written) a slide which says: “They won’t remember what you say, they’ll remember how you made them feel.” But it’s wrong. Our understanding of how emotion is used in advertising has been ill informed and poorly applied.

Zac Martin

Senior planner, Ogilvy Melbourne

Why does brand execution often kill creativity?

The launch of a new brand, or indeed a rebrand, is a transformation to be greeted with fanfare. So why is it that once the brand has launched, the brand execution phase can also be the moment at which you kill its creativity?

Rich Curtis

CEO, FutureBrand A/NZ

Sign in