Facebook rejection, acceptance the subject of PhD thesis

University of Southern Queensland PhD student Tanya Machin is researching the psychological aspects of Facebook interactions

University of Southern Queensland PhD student Tanya Machin.
University of Southern Queensland PhD student Tanya Machin.

Not getting any likes for your awesome updates on Facebook may lead consumers to feel excluded or rejected, according to research being undertaken at the University of Southern Queensland.

A new research project by PhD student, Tanya Machin, gave participants a list of 39 items to rank on their Facebook usage based on a scale ranging from `never’ to `always.’

She found four factors that motivated Facebook use: Meeting people, relationship maintenance, monitoring relationships and seeking information.

For example, one participant said they would use Facebook to meet people who are more interesting than the people they met face-to-face. Another respondent said they would use the site to get information about university-work courses from other students.

According to Machin, “very few” psychological studies have been conducted on Facebook users.

“In most social situations people are cued to rejection and acceptance so it’s interesting to see what cues people pick up from Facebook such as negative comments or the number of people who like their status updates or photos,” she said.

Machin claimed participants reacted to rejection, both real and perceived, on social media differently.

“There are many things that people can take as rejection, such as seeing friends tag each other in statuses and check-ins that you’re not part of,” she said. “Even people posting about their exciting social lives or fun activities can cause some people to feel excluded.”

Machin is now planning a second Facebook study to extend her research about rejection and acceptance cues. This will examine individuals who felt excluded due to a possible Facebook rejection and compare their reactions with people who feel socially accepted on the site.

Her thesis will be completed by the end of 2015.

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO Australia conversation on LinkedIn: CMO Australia, or join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia

Signup to CMO’s new email newsletter to receive your weekly dose of targeted content for the modern marketing chief.

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Latest Videos

More Videos

Extremely informative. One should definitely go through the blog in order to know different aspects of the Retail Business and retail Tec...

Sheetal Kamble

SAP retail chief: Why more retailers need to harness data differently

Read more

It's actually a nice and helpful piece of info. I am satisfied that you shared this helpful information with us. Please stay us informed ...

FIO Homes

How a brand facelift and content strategy turned real estate software, Rockend, around

Read more

I find this very strange. The Coles store i shop in still has Flouro lights? T though this would have been the 1st thing they would have ...

Brad

Coles launches new sustainability initiative

Read more

Well, the conversion can be increased by just using marketing, but in general if you are considering an example with Magento, then it is ...

Bob

How Remedy is using digital marketing and commerce to drive conversion

Read more

yo nice article

Bob

6 Ways to ramp up Social Media to Your Web Design

Read more

Blog Posts

9 lessons from 7 months of relentless failure

The most innovative organisations embrace failure. Why? Because it is often through failing the most creative out-of-box thinking happens. And with it comes vital learning opportunities that bring new knowledge and experience into teams.

Jacki James

Digital product lead, Starlight Children's Foundation

Why conflict can be good for your brand

Conflict is essentially a clash. When between two people, it’s just about always a clash of views or opinions. And when it comes to this type of conflict, more than the misaligned views themselves, what we typically hate the most is our physiological response.

Kathy Benson

Chief client officer, Ipsos

Brand storytelling lessons from Singapore’s iconic Fullerton hotel

In early 2020, I had the pleasure of staying at the newly opened Fullerton Hotel in Sydney. It was on this trip I first became aware of the Fullerton’s commitment to brand storytelling.

Gabrielle Dolan

Business storytelling leader

Sign in