Facebook rejection, acceptance the subject of PhD thesis

University of Southern Queensland PhD student Tanya Machin is researching the psychological aspects of Facebook interactions

University of Southern Queensland PhD student Tanya Machin.
University of Southern Queensland PhD student Tanya Machin.

Not getting any likes for your awesome updates on Facebook may lead consumers to feel excluded or rejected, according to research being undertaken at the University of Southern Queensland.

A new research project by PhD student, Tanya Machin, gave participants a list of 39 items to rank on their Facebook usage based on a scale ranging from `never’ to `always.’

She found four factors that motivated Facebook use: Meeting people, relationship maintenance, monitoring relationships and seeking information.

For example, one participant said they would use Facebook to meet people who are more interesting than the people they met face-to-face. Another respondent said they would use the site to get information about university-work courses from other students.

According to Machin, “very few” psychological studies have been conducted on Facebook users.

“In most social situations people are cued to rejection and acceptance so it’s interesting to see what cues people pick up from Facebook such as negative comments or the number of people who like their status updates or photos,” she said.

Machin claimed participants reacted to rejection, both real and perceived, on social media differently.

“There are many things that people can take as rejection, such as seeing friends tag each other in statuses and check-ins that you’re not part of,” she said. “Even people posting about their exciting social lives or fun activities can cause some people to feel excluded.”

Machin is now planning a second Facebook study to extend her research about rejection and acceptance cues. This will examine individuals who felt excluded due to a possible Facebook rejection and compare their reactions with people who feel socially accepted on the site.

Her thesis will be completed by the end of 2015.

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO Australia conversation on LinkedIn: CMO Australia, or join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia

Signup to CMO’s new email newsletter to receive your weekly dose of targeted content for the modern marketing chief.

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Blog Posts

Does your brand need a personality review?

There are five tell-tale signs your brand needs to take a long hard look at itself.

Charlie Rose

Senior Strategy Consultant, Principals

How to create profitable pricing

How do we price goods and services? As business leaders, we have asked ourselves this question since the history of trading.

Lee Naylor

Managing partner, The Leading Edge

Sport and sponsorship: The value of event sponsorship

Australia’s cricketers captured the nation’s attention during their recent run to the semi-final of the ICC Men’s World Cup. While the tournament ultimately ended in defeat, for over a month it provoked a sense of belonging, hope and empowerment for millions of people across Australia. Cricket, and sport in general, has a near-unique ability to empower individuals, irrelevant of their background, demographic or nationality.

Nikhil Arora

Vice-president and managing director, GoDaddy India

I had the same vision about change from CX terminology to HX. Even with almost the same title: 'Forget customer experience...' https://ww...

Ekaterina Khramkova

Forget customer experience, human experience is marketing's next frontier

Read more

Thank you, so do I.

David Freeman

Sustainability of message: H2coco founder's commitment to consumers

Read more

Hi Harry, thank you for pointing this out I can confidently say both these bottles are in transition away from PET as we continue to impr...

David Freeman

Sustainability of message: H2coco founder's commitment to consumers

Read more

I’m confused. He has a giant 2l hard plastic bottle in Coles and his pink bottle is also in plastic??

Harry

Sustainability of message: H2coco founder's commitment to consumers

Read more

Great message from an Aussie company about sustainable business practices, particularly packaging. Wish more businesses would think more ...

Krisy

Sustainability of message: H2coco founder's commitment to consumers

Read more

Latest Podcast

More podcasts

Sign in