ADMA offers up new voluntary data breach code of conduct

On the day a senate committee is due to decide on compulsory privacy data breach notifications, marketing association offers to work with the privacy commissioner on new codes of conduct

The Association for Data-driven Marketing and Advertising (ADMA) is calling on the privacy commissioner to consider a new voluntary code for privacy data breaches and stop compulsory notifications being approved by the Australian senate.

The association has offered to work with the commissioner to produce a new voluntary code that would establish clear benchmarks for reporting privacy data breaches. This would be an alternative to the current Data Breach Notification Guide of the Office of the Australian Information Comissioner, as well as the proposed Privacy Alerts legislation being debated by the Australian Parliament.

A senate committee is due to give its report on the proposed Privacy Alerts Bill today (24 June). As previously reported, ADMA CEO Jodie Sangster criticised plans for compulsory data breach notifications last week, claiming the administrative requirements these imposed would cripple hundreds of thousands of Australian businesses.

The latest proposal from ADMA, announced today, would tackle several key issues with the compulsory bill, including a definition of a ‘serious data breach’, so that businesses will know when to report an error. It would also detail benchmarks for different kinds of data issues including cyber attacks, hacking and external threats.

ADMA is also proposing third-party monitoring, auditing and enforcement. According to Sangster, the latest voluntary proposal is consistent with the government’s commitment to support innovation in the digital economy, while offering a more constructive way of dealing with the data privacy issue.

“We are saying to the government, don’t do this to Australian business; give voluntary reporting another chance,” she said.

Sangster called for the senate to refer the matter to the Australian Law Reform Council (ALRC), rather than ram new legislation through parliament’s last week of sitting.

“We recommend that this matter be referred to the ALRC as part of its new privacy reference and that a proper consultation process be undertaken before the legislation is given further consideration by parliament,” Sangster said.

In contrast, the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network (ACANN) has claimed the data breach notifications are necessary and claims arguments that the move would create an “undue burden on business” are a means to sweep privacy breaches under the carpet.

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO Australia conversation on LinkedIn: CMO Australia, or join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Blog Posts

Building a human-curated brand

If the FANG (Facebook, Amazon, Netflix, Google) sector and their measured worth are the final argument for the successful 21st Century model, then they are beyond reproach. Fine-tuning masses of algorithms to reduce human touchpoints and deliver wild returns to investors—all with workforces infinitesimally small compared to the giants of the 20th Century—has been proven out.

Will Smith

Co-founder and head of new markets, The Plum Guide

Sustainability trends brands can expect in 2020

​Marketers have made strides this year in sustainability with the number of brands rallying behind the Not Business As Usual alliance for action against climate change being a sign of the times. While sustainability efforts have gained momentum this year, 2020 is shaping up to be the year brands are really held accountable for their work in this area.

Ben King

CSR manager & sustainability expert, Finder

The trouble with Scotty from Marketing

As a Marketer, the ‘Scotty from Marketing’ meme troubles me.

Natalie Robinson

Director of marketing and communications, Melbourne Polytechnic

If you think it can benefit both consumer and seller then it would be great

Simon Bird

Why Ford is counting on the Internet of Things to drive customer engagement

Read more

It's a good idea. Customers really should control their data. Now I understand why it's important.

Elvin Huntsberry

Salesforce CMO: Modern marketers have an obligation to give customers control of their data

Read more

Instagram changes algorithms every time you get used to them. It really pisses me off. What else pisses me off? The fact that Instagram d...

Nickwood

Instagram loses the like in Australia; industry reacts positively

Read more

I tried www.analisa.io to see my Instagram Insight

Dina Rahmawati

7 marketing technology predictions for 2016

Read more

The saying is pretty tongue in cheek. It's not saying that marketers are bad people, nor that they don't take themselves seriously. There...

LYF Solutions

The trouble with Scotty from Marketing - The CMO view - CMO Australia

Read more

Latest Podcast

More podcasts

Sign in