IDC: No end in sight for rising smartphone sales

Worldwide smartphone shipments will push close to the billion-unit level this year

Emerging markets and lower prices will push worldwide smartphone shipments close to the billion-unit level this year, according to the latest forecast by IDC.

That company is predicting total smartphone sales of 958.8 million for the calendar year, marking a nearly 33% rise from last year's figure of 722.5 million units.

Nearly two-thirds of all smartphones purchased around the world in 2013 will be bought in developing countries, IDC says, compared to just 43% in 2010. Part of that, according to IDC program manager Ryan Reith, is explained by lower prices.

[ MORE MOBILITY:Why BlackBerry's tepid tablet strategy could be its fatal flaw]

"Smartphones have become increasingly common in emerging markets and it is often the first affordable means of computing for these markets. These are markets where average personal income is far less than in developed markets, and therefore vendors have been forced to create smartphone computing experiences for the low end of the market," he said in a statement, noting that average prices dropped 8% in 2012, and that a further 9% is expected this year.

Manufacturers continuing to make 3G phones alongside more expensive 4G models has helped push average costs lower, IDC asserts -- older-model wireless technology is far less expensive than top-of-the-line parts. The researchers predict that 71% of all smartphones sold in 2013 will be 3G models, and that their market share won't slip below 50% until after 2017.

The long-promised shift to a majority-smartphone world will come to pass this year as well, the researchers say, predicting that smart devices would make up 52% of the mobile market in 2013. Demand for mobile computing will only continue to rise across the developing world, reinforcing the strong growth trend seen by IDC.

A study from Counterpoint Research published earlier in 2013 pointed to Samsung, Apple and LG as the largest beneficiaries of the swelling market, with the South Korean company alone accounting for 70 million shipments in just the first quarter of the year.

Email Jon Gold at jgold@nww.com and follow him on Twitter at @NWWJonGold.

Read more about anti-malware in Network World's Anti-malware section.

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Latest Videos

More Videos

Are you sure they wont start a platform that the cheese is white, pretty sure that is racist

Hite

New brand name for Coon Cheese revealed

Read more

Real digital transformation requires reshaping the way the business create value for customers. Achieving this requires that organization...

ravi H

10 lessons Telstra has learnt through its T22 transformation

Read more

thanks

Lillian Juliet

How Winedirect has lifted customer recency, frequency and value with a digital overhaul

Read more

Having an effective Point of Sale system implemented in your retail store can streamline the transactions and data management activities....

Sheetal Kamble

​Jurlique’s move to mobile POS set to enhance customer experience

Read more

I too am regularly surprised at how little care a large swathe of consumers take over the sharing and use of their personal data. As a m...

Catherine Stenson

Have customers really changed? - Marketing edge - CMO Australia

Read more

Blog Posts

Brand storytelling lessons from Singapore’s iconic Fullerton hotel

In early 2020, I had the pleasure of staying at the newly opened Fullerton Hotel in Sydney. It was on this trip I first became aware of the Fullerton’s commitment to brand storytelling.

Gabrielle Dolan

Business storytelling leader

You’re doing it wrong: Emotion doesn’t mean emotional

If you’ve been around advertising long enough, you’ve probably seen (or written) a slide which says: “They won’t remember what you say, they’ll remember how you made them feel.” But it’s wrong. Our understanding of how emotion is used in advertising has been ill informed and poorly applied.

Zac Martin

Senior planner, Ogilvy Melbourne

Why does brand execution often kill creativity?

The launch of a new brand, or indeed a rebrand, is a transformation to be greeted with fanfare. So why is it that once the brand has launched, the brand execution phase can also be the moment at which you kill its creativity?

Rich Curtis

CEO, FutureBrand A/NZ

Sign in