Oo.com.au partners with Responsys to overhaul digital customer strategy

Australian online retailer adopts Responsys' digital marketing platform in a bid to improve customer retention and utilise behavioural insights in a more efficient way

Australian online retailer, Oo.com.au, has adopted Responsys’ digital marketing platform to drive its customer retention and management strategy across web, social and display.

The company has brought on the cloud-based Responsys Interact Suite and plans to roll-out an integrated cross-channel CRM program aimed at boosting the longer-term value of customers. A key part of the technology overhaul is focused on driving customer retention by better use of behavioural insights and data.

Oo.com.au online marketing manager, Alfredo Caballero, said its objective is to understand customers better, maximise growth opportunities and shore up its online retail position. The online department store launched in 2004 and is focused on products across a wide variety of categories including electronics, furniture, beauty and toys.

Prior to engaging Responsys, OO.com.au collected customer data in multiple environments across the business. The company claimed this hindered the marketing team’s ability to quickly and easily target customers based on behaviours and preferences, and also chewed up resource time.

“We can now digest customer information in a more efficient way, gather actionable insights and have a far clearer visibility of the initiatives that will drive results for our business,” Caballero said.

According to president of Responsys Asia-Pacific, Paul Cross, companies operating in the increasingly competitive retail landscape need to shift their focus from mass acquisition marketing to long-lasting relationships.

“By recognising the need to transform its digital marketing strategy, OO.com.au is continuing its legacy as a forward-thinking and innovative brand,” he claimed.

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia or take part in the CMO Australia conversation on LinkedIn: CMO Australia.

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