National Broadband Network marketing chief quits

NBN Co is on the hunt for a new general manager of marketing after John Casey announces his resignation

The hunt is on for a new marketing chief for the National Broadband Network (NBN) after its first general manager of marketing, John Casey, announced his resignation.

A spokesperson for NBN Co, the wholesale telco arm responsible for the national rollout, confirmed Casey will leave at the end of May after just one year in the role to pursue another undisclosed position. The NBN Co executive team is now searching for his successor.

Casey joined NBN Co last May as its first marketing chief after a stint as head of marketing at Vodafone Australia. His departure is one of six from the company’s communications team of 52 and has raised speculation in the national press about the desirability of staying at the company in the lead-up to the Federal Election in September.

In response, the spokesperson claimed NBN Co’s attrition rate is less than half the national average and that Casey was the only senior staff departure from the communications division.

“The chief marketing officer’s role was created in order to bring structure around our communications to ordinary Australians on the significant rollout of the NBN,” the spokesperson said.

“The company itself is also still growing – we have really just made the move from a start-up to a wholesale telecommunications company and we’re only at the beginning of this monumental task of upgrading the entire nation’s infrastructure.”

The spokesperson was unable to confirm when NBN Co hoped to have a new general of marketing in place.

The NBN Co was established in 2009 as a wholly-owned government company to oversee the build of Australia’s next-generation broadband network. The NBN will connect 93 per cent of Australian premises with 100MBps fibre-to-the-premise (FFTP) broadband services by 2021.

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia or take part in the CMO Australia conversation on LinkedIn: CMO Australia.

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Latest Videos

More Videos

Are you sure they wont start a platform that the cheese is white, pretty sure that is racist

Hite

New brand name for Coon Cheese revealed

Read more

Real digital transformation requires reshaping the way the business create value for customers. Achieving this requires that organization...

ravi H

10 lessons Telstra has learnt through its T22 transformation

Read more

thanks

Lillian Juliet

How Winedirect has lifted customer recency, frequency and value with a digital overhaul

Read more

Having an effective Point of Sale system implemented in your retail store can streamline the transactions and data management activities....

Sheetal Kamble

​Jurlique’s move to mobile POS set to enhance customer experience

Read more

I too am regularly surprised at how little care a large swathe of consumers take over the sharing and use of their personal data. As a m...

Catherine Stenson

Have customers really changed? - Marketing edge - CMO Australia

Read more

Blog Posts

Brand storytelling lessons from Singapore’s iconic Fullerton hotel

In early 2020, I had the pleasure of staying at the newly opened Fullerton Hotel in Sydney. It was on this trip I first became aware of the Fullerton’s commitment to brand storytelling.

Gabrielle Dolan

Business storytelling leader

You’re doing it wrong: Emotion doesn’t mean emotional

If you’ve been around advertising long enough, you’ve probably seen (or written) a slide which says: “They won’t remember what you say, they’ll remember how you made them feel.” But it’s wrong. Our understanding of how emotion is used in advertising has been ill informed and poorly applied.

Zac Martin

Senior planner, Ogilvy Melbourne

Why does brand execution often kill creativity?

The launch of a new brand, or indeed a rebrand, is a transformation to be greeted with fanfare. So why is it that once the brand has launched, the brand execution phase can also be the moment at which you kill its creativity?

Rich Curtis

CEO, FutureBrand A/NZ

Sign in