Google may have smart eyeglasses but Budweiser has smart beer glasses

New campaign turns a physical meeting into a Facebook connection

Budweiser is trying to make it easier to make friends -- Facebook friends -- when you're drinking beer.

The company's Brazilian development team has come out with the Buddy Cup, a beer glass with an embedded chip. When two Buddy Cups are clinked together, they automatically send friend requests to the users' Facebook pages.

"Budweiser loves to share in great times with our fans," said Manuel Rangel Machiavello of Budweiser Brazil in an email. "The Buddy Cup brings together the in-bar experience with Facebook, the most used social media channel for our consumers."

According to Budweiser, users scan a bar code on the bottom of the cup and provide information from their Facebook profiles so the cup can connect to their Facebook accounts.

"We did a first pilot event here in Sao Paulo to test the prototype," said Machiavello. "It was an instant success and we had the chance to register users' reactions as well. Lots of friends were made that night. Based on the positive reactions, we are looking at taking this to bigger events in future."

Budweiser's smart beer glass comes on the heels of Google's plans to develop smart eyeglasses.

Google has started distributing the futuristic-looking, wearable computers to developers and early testers, called Explorers. Google glasses are designed to enable users to take pictures and video, send email and post information on social networks like Google+ and Facebook.

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia or take part in the CMO Australia conversation on LinkedIn: CMO Australia.

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Latest Videos

More Videos

It's an interesting direction, and fair play that they've backed what their service differentiator in the market is. It's a bit clunky bi...

Jeff

Versa launches bot-activated website

Read more

Algorithms that can make sense of unstructured data is the future. It's great to see experts in the field getting together to discuss AI.

Sumit Takim

In pictures: Harnessing AI for customer engagement - CMO roundtable Melbourne

Read more

Real digital transformation requires reshaping the way the business create value for customers. Achieving this requires that organization...

ravi H

10 lessons Telstra has learnt through its T22 transformation

Read more

thanks

Lillian Juliet

How Winedirect has lifted customer recency, frequency and value with a digital overhaul

Read more

Having an effective Point of Sale system implemented in your retail store can streamline the transactions and data management activities....

Sheetal Kamble

​Jurlique’s move to mobile POS set to enhance customer experience

Read more

Blog Posts

Brand storytelling lessons from Singapore’s iconic Fullerton hotel

In early 2020, I had the pleasure of staying at the newly opened Fullerton Hotel in Sydney. It was on this trip I first became aware of the Fullerton’s commitment to brand storytelling.

Gabrielle Dolan

Business storytelling leader

You’re doing it wrong: Emotion doesn’t mean emotional

If you’ve been around advertising long enough, you’ve probably seen (or written) a slide which says: “They won’t remember what you say, they’ll remember how you made them feel.” But it’s wrong. Our understanding of how emotion is used in advertising has been ill informed and poorly applied.

Zac Martin

Senior planner, Ogilvy Melbourne

Why does brand execution often kill creativity?

The launch of a new brand, or indeed a rebrand, is a transformation to be greeted with fanfare. So why is it that once the brand has launched, the brand execution phase can also be the moment at which you kill its creativity?

Rich Curtis

CEO, FutureBrand A/NZ

Sign in