Spreecast moves to smartphones as social video chat gains ground

Spreecast launched in 2011 as a more public way to have watercooler conversations. Now the social video platform is going mobile.

Social video site Spreecast is taking its hybrid of live streams and interactive conversations to smartphones with a pair of apps released Thursday for iOS and Android.

The once desktop-only Spreecast launched in 2011 as a forum for users to have public conversations with each other. Unlike video platforms like Skype, which let users chat privately, or live streaming sites like uStream or Justin.tv, which let you watch live events, Spreecast is more like a 1960s party line updated for the 21st century.

How it works: Users set up a channel and pick a topic to discuss. People can browse the list of channels and request to join in an interesting video conversation. That request must be approved by the conversation's host, or they can participate in the chatroom alongside the video. Spreecast can host up to four simultaneous streams, so four people can appear on the feed at once. You don't have to download a client or install any software; Spreecast is all online. Or it has been, until now.

Who it's for: News organizations like the Wall Street Journal andLos Angeles Times and professional broadcasters like Scott Baker are already using Spreecast to do one-hour shows or host journalist chats on current events. But anyone can use Spreecast, which is part of its appeal.

Many of its regular users aren't even registered, Spreecast CEO Jeff Fluhr says. Fluhr declined to disclose how many people have signed up, but said audience is growing and a "significant number" of people are trying to access Spreecast on their smartphones.

There are Web conferencing services, private video platforms, and streaming sites galore, but there are few sites that let you watch other conversations and jump in, if you want. If you miss a chat, the site archives all conversations for future playback.

"[People] are having public forum conversations; it's like the future of the watercooler," says Fluhr, who also founded ticket-selling site StubHub. "You might gather around and talk about a game that happened last night or a current event like the bombings in Boston or the new pope. That's the kind of conversation you can find on Spreecast every day."

That democratization of current events is now going mobile. Spreecast's mobile users will be able to watch and chat along with broadcasts, and a future version of the app will in a few months let viewers join in on camera.

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Latest Videos

More Videos

yes AI should be a course so many People Use AI https://g-techsolutions.com...

M Abdullah Khan

Is AI on course to take over human creativity? - Modern creative - CMO Australia

Read more

Extremely informative. One should definitely go through the blog in order to know different aspects of the top retail technology.

Pooja Gupta

Donut King takes in-store marketing to the next digital level

Read more

this is very benefit for us we can through all the thing in this and its very benefit for city personhttps://g-techsolutions.com...

M Abdullah Khan

What does the Oculus Rift launch mean for marketers?

Read more

as we all known AI is very spread and alot of companies used ai and we take alot of work from AI https://g-techsolutions.com...

M Abdullah Khan

Making sense artificial intelligence - Food for thought - CMO Australia

Read more

virtual marketing have as much benefits as also disadvantageshttps://g-techsolutions.com...

M Abdullah Khan

The ethical debate facing marketers around virtual reality - Data-driven marketing - CMO Australia

Read more

Blog Posts

Brand storytelling lessons from Singapore’s iconic Fullerton hotel

In early 2020, I had the pleasure of staying at the newly opened Fullerton Hotel in Sydney. It was on this trip I first became aware of the Fullerton’s commitment to brand storytelling.

Gabrielle Dolan

Business storytelling leader

You’re doing it wrong: Emotion doesn’t mean emotional

If you’ve been around advertising long enough, you’ve probably seen (or written) a slide which says: “They won’t remember what you say, they’ll remember how you made them feel.” But it’s wrong. Our understanding of how emotion is used in advertising has been ill informed and poorly applied.

Zac Martin

Senior planner, Ogilvy Melbourne

Why does brand execution often kill creativity?

The launch of a new brand, or indeed a rebrand, is a transformation to be greeted with fanfare. So why is it that once the brand has launched, the brand execution phase can also be the moment at which you kill its creativity?

Rich Curtis

CEO, FutureBrand A/NZ

Sign in