Most Internet users want to end tracking of personal data: Ovum

Privacy advocate says privacy settings alone are not enough for users to feel reassured that their personal data will be protected

Most Internet users around the world would put an end to their personal data being collected and tracked by companies if they could easily do so, according Ovum’s latest Consumer Insights Survey.

The survey consists of 11,000 respondents across 11 counties and found that 68 per cent of respondents said that if there was a ‘do not track’ option on the websites they visit they would use it to stop Internet companies from tracking them.

“Taking the supply of… personal data for granted seems to be an accident waiting to happen,” Ovum analyst Mark Little said.

The survey also found 86 per cent do not trust Internet companies to be honest about what they do with users’ data.

With concerns over Google and Facebook changing their data use policies, for example, and the ongoing privacy issues that arise from the Internet, Ovum said users are showing their reluctance to share content online.

“However, consumers are being empowered with new tools and services to monitor, control, and secure their personal data as never before, and it seems they increasingly have the motivation to use them,” said Little.

He said companies need to keep developing more advanced privacy tools and settings and build user trust by being more transparent in their data collection and use policies.

However, privacy advocate David Lindsay from the Australian Privacy Foundation said privacy settings alone are not enough for users to feel reassured that their data will be protected. He said more privacy laws are needed if users are to be confident that Internet companies will act in the best interests of their users.

“While privacy protection technologies have some role to play, the protection of consumers' personal data is simply too important to leave to private developers and the market. If governments want to promote the digital economy the best thing they can do is to enact strong privacy laws, and ensure that those laws are properly enforced,” he said.

“By taking these steps, governments can assist in building consumer confidence in online transactions, which is threatened by current and emerging tracking technologies.”

Ovum said if majority of Internet users were to stop companies from being able to track them it would “threaten” the digital economy.

“This hardening of consumer attitudes, coupled with tightening regulation, could diminish personal data supply lines and have a considerable impact on targeted advertising, CRM, big data analytics, and other digital industries.”

Lindsay said building user trust is the “most important driver for growing the digital economy” and Internet companies should put privacy at the centre when implementing new policies or technologies.

Follow Rebecca Merrett on Twitter: @Rebecca_Merrett

Follow CIO Australia on Twitter and Like us on Facebook… Twitter: @CIO_Australia, Facebook: CIO Australia, or take part in the CIO conversation on LinkedIn: CIO Australia

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Latest Videos

More Videos

Well, the conversion can be increased by just using marketing, but in general if you are considering an example with Magento, then it is ...

Bob

How Remedy is using digital marketing and commerce to drive conversion

Read more

yo nice article

Bob

6 Ways to ramp up Social Media to Your Web Design

Read more

Thanks for sharing with us. I just loved your way of presentation. I enjoyed reading this .Thanks for sharing and keep writing. It is goo...

Nisha

Cancer Council: Finding the physical-virtual engagement balance post-COVID

Read more

yes AI should be a course so many People Use AI https://g-techsolutions.com...

M Abdullah Khan

Is AI on course to take over human creativity? - Modern creative - CMO Australia

Read more

Extremely informative. One should definitely go through the blog in order to know different aspects of the top retail technology.

Pooja Gupta

Donut King takes in-store marketing to the next digital level

Read more

Blog Posts

Brand storytelling lessons from Singapore’s iconic Fullerton hotel

In early 2020, I had the pleasure of staying at the newly opened Fullerton Hotel in Sydney. It was on this trip I first became aware of the Fullerton’s commitment to brand storytelling.

Gabrielle Dolan

Business storytelling leader

You’re doing it wrong: Emotion doesn’t mean emotional

If you’ve been around advertising long enough, you’ve probably seen (or written) a slide which says: “They won’t remember what you say, they’ll remember how you made them feel.” But it’s wrong. Our understanding of how emotion is used in advertising has been ill informed and poorly applied.

Zac Martin

Senior planner, Ogilvy Melbourne

Why does brand execution often kill creativity?

The launch of a new brand, or indeed a rebrand, is a transformation to be greeted with fanfare. So why is it that once the brand has launched, the brand execution phase can also be the moment at which you kill its creativity?

Rich Curtis

CEO, FutureBrand A/NZ

Sign in