Marketers need to adopt a more operational mindset to cope with social

Lithium VP also announces research that shows most Australians do not trust advertising but do trust peer online reviews and forums

The role of marketing is increasingly being driven by what happens with the customer after they have purchased a product, and CMOs must take more responsibility as a result.

That’s the view of Lithium vice-president of social strategy, Dave Evans, who spoke at today’s Forrester Summit for Marketing and Strategy Professionals in Sydney about how social is changing the way individuals engage with brands, and why more organisations need to strengthen their social customer experience strategies.

His presentation also touched on Lithium’s new Australian consumer research released today, which found 28 per cent of Australians don’t trust advertising at all. In contrast, 63 per cent trust online product reviews, 60 per cent trust like-minded peer-to-peer communities, and 43 per cent trust social networks.

The research was based on a poll done in Australia by Harris Poll in May among more than 1000 consumers between 18 and 64 years of age.

When questioned about the role CMOs must assume in social strategy leadership, Evans told attendees it was inevitable that marketers deal with the ramifications of customers communicating about their products and services through these new public digital channels.

In particular, he noted the impact post-purchase social conversations have had on the consideration process for other potential customers.

“All this social stuff interrupts the marketing process and buyer journey marketers have set in place,” Evans said. “The savvy marketing person therefore is now moving over into operations.”

The thing that drives conversations in social is not the sale itself, but how the consumer utilises those products afterwards, Evans continued.

“Marketers are finding themselves in the middle of those operations [issues] and they have to start taking ownership of those conversations,” he said. “The reality of consumer expectations today has shifted that job.”

Related: Fox Sports shows sports fans the love with social engagement

Evans also commented on the traditional approach to advertising versus the new two-way dynamic consumers expect to engage in with brands today.

“As advertisers, we have been used to getting to interrupt you in personal or key moments of your life,” he said. “Now as a consumer armed with social channels that are mine, or that I can at least participate in, I have the ability to interrupt your brand. And I am looking for the assurance that you are listening and are as happy to be interrupted as I am by you.”

Among Evans’ key tips for a strong social media strategy are to be the messenger, listen and respond to customers through social networks, give customers a place to connect and share information, review your historical spend mix and reinvest in social, and make a commitment to change.

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO Australia conversation on LinkedIn: CMO Australia, join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia, or check us out on Google+: google.com/+CmoAu

Signup to CMO’s email newsletter to receive your weekly dose of targeted content for the modern marketing chief.

Join the CMO newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Supporting Association

Blog Posts

The real asset of small data – getting granular unearths opportunities

When most marketers use the word ‘data’, what springs to mind are large sets of numbers, Excel spreadsheets, cloud-based IT systems and complicated algorithms. Big data speak is the mot du jour. There is even a big data Week in London called the Festival of Data.

Pip Stocks

CEO and founder, BrandHook

Digital Transformation challenges for CMOs

New problems are rarely fixed by applying old thinking. In the last decade, a combination of circumstances has evolved that requires new thinking from marketers. This new thinking takes advantage of the digital environment and transforms business as we know it.

Mark Cameron

CEO, Working Three

Why innovation requires less certainty and more ambiguity

According to the Knowledge Doubling Theory, the sum total of human knowledge doubles every 12-13 months. With the full evolution of the Internet of Things, it will eventually double every 12 hours. Faced with such a sea of shifting data and knowledge, how can we make progress if we try to nail everything down to a certainty?

Matt Whale

Managing director, How To Impact

Need to improve your customer journey? We're excited to announce that we are holding that we are holding two more sessions of our sellout...

Proto Partners

Customer journeys: The new differentiation battlefield - Customer insights - CMO Australia

Read more

Thanks Mark. A third of customers leave brands after one negative experience, thats why it is ever so important that we optimise EVERY in...

Proto Partners

Customer journeys: The new differentiation battlefield - Customer insights - CMO Australia

Read more

Hi Kyle -- great piece. I couldn't agree with you more when you say that we as marketers are in the business of choice. I actually wrot...

Matthew Willcox

Tapping behavioural science for consumer influence

Read more

Great points. When it comes to optimizing the app experience, making sure you collect rich usage data is important, but making sure you c...

Dustin Amrhein

Why app engagement must be personalised - Mobile strategy - CMO Australia

Read more

You can also use automation to help keep the contact database nice and tidy. For example, programs that check and fix database values (eg...

automatico

3 brands using marketing automation for more than just email

Read more

Latest Podcast

More podcasts

Sign in