Australians are quick to embrace wearable technology

New report from Rackspace finds Australians are adopting wearable technologies much faster than consumers in the US and UK, and also predicts the rise of the human cloud of rich data

Australians are embracing wearable technology at a faster rate than their international counterparts, according to a new study into usage across consumers nationally.

The new report from Rackspace Hosting, The Human Cloud: Wearable Technology from Novelty to Productivity, claims to be the first such study into the impact of wearable technology on individuals, as well as its impact on customer data management and the cloud. It comes as the industry prepares for the onslaught of new wearable devices in the mainstream market stretching from Google Glasses to Samsung’s new Galaxy Gear smartwatch and Apple’s iWatch.

The survey found 35 per cent of Australians have used some form of wearable technology to date such as health and fitness monitors, smart glasses, watches, clothing or cameras. This is nearly double the percentage of consumers in the UK and US (18 per cent).

Of those who have used wearable technology, 64 per cent believe it has enhanced their lives. Health and fitness was the most prevalent example, with 67 per cent claiming such devices contributed to improved health and fitness. One in four also claimed wearable tech has helped their career development.

In addition, 32 per cent felt more intelligence thanks to wearable technology, and 46 per cent felt more informed. Thirty-seven per cent also claimed to have experienced a self-esteem boost by having access to wearable technologies, while one in three felt more in control of their lives.

Surprisingly, 22 per cent claim wearable technology even improved their love lives.

Rackspace Australia director and general manager, Angus Dorney, said the industry is on the cusp of mainstream wearable devices uptake, and forecast the rise of a new ‘human cloud’ of personal data. As consumers become permanently connected, organisations will be given richer data streams and access to new opportunities to understand individuals, but will also face challenges around customer data management, privacy and interaction.

“It is important to note that wearable technology and the cloud go hand-in-hand,” Dorney said. “Cloud services, such as computing, storage and a suite of new databases, will power the wearable technology revolution.

“The rich data created by wearable tech will drive the rise of the ‘human cloud’… with this comes countless opportunities to tap into this data; whether it’s connecting with third parties to provide more tailored or personalised services, or working closer with healthcare institutions to get a better understanding of their patients.

“Organisations need to assess whether they are ready to capture and process this rich new source of data. They also need to consider how they will drive deeper customer understanding and new benefits from this technology revolution.”

The Rackspace sponsored survey was conducted by Pure Profile and included responses from 750 Australians between 18-64 years of age.

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO Australia conversation on LinkedIn: CMO Australia, or join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia

Signup to CMO’s new email newsletter to receive your weekly dose of targeted content for the modern marketing chief.

Join the CMO newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Supporting Association

Blog Posts

The evolving role of the CMO

They say that “change is the only constant”. It’s fair to say that in the 20 years I’ve been in marketing positions, the role of the CMO has changed completely.

Tim Tez

Chief product and marketing officer, MetLife

Transform your marketing analytics to outperform your competition

As digital and offline brand experiences diversify, more customer data is becoming available to marketers. At the same time, the number of tools available to analyse this data is increasing rapidly. Leading marketers are taking advantages of these shifts and transforming their marketing analytics practices to outperform their competitors.

What CMOs get wrong with content marketing

Content marketing: It’s everywhere you look, and it’s a proven component of an effective marketing strategy. And yet more than half of all marketing professionals struggle with a lack of internal content creation resources.

Aaron Agius

Co-founder and managing director, Louder Online

I have consistently the worst customer experiences from AUSPOST. I regularly send packages and letters via registered post service, and t...

Winnifred Antoinette Mok

Aus Post's customer chief: CX is about convenience, control and choice

Read more

Such a great new you've shared with us I really agree with the records you shared as this is true that this report may able to quantify t...

Lucy Eva

Report: Mobile app time dominates Australian smartphone usage

Read more

It is heartening to see that the South Pole Group use a Balanced Scorecard to monitor progress. In such a complex area where communicatio...

Clive Keyte

How South Pole Group is tapping media intelligence for customer conversion

Read more

Having had the pleasure of working with Kim, she has one of the strongest strategic minds I have ever come across. She has the ability to...

Anonymous

Helloworld scraps CMO role

Read more

This is what happens when dealing with 3rd party technology, get technology inhale and never weary about this anymore .

KyleThomas

Criteo and Steelhouse legal spat escalates

Read more

Latest Podcast

More podcasts

Sign in